What’s So Odd About a Young Moon in Late Fall?

November 20th, 2017, 5:10 p.m. local time

A bitter, windy chill was in the air tonight, with calm and clear heavens in strong deference.  The young crescent Moon made its Monthly debut in the West.  Few will notice before it sets.

The Moon has now passed by the Sun three times in the sky since the Great North American Eclipse of 2017.  Summer turned to Fall.  Fall is rapidly giving way to Winter.  The wonderful sites of the cosmos are available on nights like these for those who wish to seize the opportunity.  But don’t wait too long, for the Sun and Moon and stars wait for no one as their eternal journey carries on.

Most trees framing this evening’s Moon have already started their annual hibernation.  But amazingly, here in the Midwest in late November, many trees are stubbornly holding onto their leaves, though they usually would have been shed weeks ago by now.  Notice the one tree in the background still full as if in mid September.  I do not know what’s up with the trees this year, but they do need to hurry up if they don’t want to miss Winter.

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Halloween Moon

October 31st, 2017, 9:00 p.m. local time

Ghostly clouds and autumn leaves bring you tonight’s Moon on this last day of October.

The Moon and a Plane

October 25th, 2017, 6:01 p.m. local time

Sometimes the quickest astrophotography snaps yield surprises.  I was not even trying to include the plane, honest!

Moon Falling in Daylight

October 9th, 2017, 9:45 a.m. local time

On Monday, the Moon was still out well into the morning, but setting towards the horizon in a clear, blue, and near-empty sky.  These early Waning phase days are a reminder that astrophotography can be done all day and all night.  Granted, your targets during the day will be three at most (Sun, Moon, Venus), but the pursuit is nonetheless possible.

When is the Moon fully Full?

Taken with Canon EOS Rebel. f/5.6, 1/500 sec., 100 ISO, 300mm focal length.

October 4th, 2017, 9:30 p.m. local time

Last night was “Full Moon night.”  The Moon passed from its prior Waxing phase and is now in its Waning phase, were it shall remain until the next New Moon.

When is the Moon truly full?  If you look at my image above from last night, taken with my digital camera, you may believe this is a Full Moon.  But it is more likely a 99-99.9% Waxing Gibbous.  How can you tell?  Notice on the right side how there is a thin circular line along the circumference of the Moon’s edge.  This indicates the direction of the Sun relative to the Moon as seen from my location on Earth.  Now look at the left side and note the absence of that circular line.  Instead, on the left you still see the shadows of craters at the extreme edge of our viewing range.

At some point last night, yes the Moon went fully Full and the line traced a complete circle.  That is your real Full Moon.  Tonight, that circular line will now be on the left side with crater shadows visible on the right.

Someday I hope to capture a true Full Moon.  Its appearance is relative every Moon cycle, so instead of relying on luck, whenever I have more time I will look up the exact UTC time and be ready to photograph at that moment.

Better Than a Quarter Moon

Click for the hi-res image.

August 30th, 2017, 8:59 p.m. local time

Me: “Wow, such an amazing Moon tonight!  I should get my telescope or at least digital camera to take some pictures.”

Me Too: “Well, since you did only a smartphone capture last night, let’s drag the big telescope out for this one.  Even I have to admit this is too good of a Moon to waste.”

Me: “Great!”

Me Too: “Ok.  Just make sure you produce something fantastic worth both our time.”

Two Sides of the Quarter Moon

August 29th, 2017, 7:10 p.m. local time

Me: “Wow, that’s a great looking Quarter Moon tonight!  I should get my telescope or at least digital camera to take some pictures.”

Me Too: “You’re pretty tired.  Are you sure you want to lug all that equipment outside?  Plus, it’s a work night.”

Me: “How about a compromise: I’ll go get my smartphone and snap a few images?  That will take hardly any time at all.”

Me Too: “Ok, deal, but you’re cooking dinner tonight.”

The Backwards Moon

August 13th, 2017, 04:15 a.m. local time

Farmers and early risers will disagree, but I think of the Moon’s waning phases as backwards.  I have been use all my life to seeing the waxing Moon in the evenings.

Attempting to view meteors on Sunday gave me a rare opportunity to photograph a healthy looking backwards Moon at its midpoint sky travel that day.  As I had already prepared my digital camera and tripod for meteor hunting, it was not much effort to first attach a longer lens for the Moon.  Today’s picture is from Sunday morning with only minor touch-ups performed in PaintShop Pro.

Of course, this monthly cycle has special significant as this particular Moon phase gradually creeps Eastward every day to rendezvous with the Sun for the North America solar eclipse on Monday, August 21st.

Meteor Hunting, 2017 Edition

No meteors, but how many constellations do you see?

August 13th, 2017, 04:30 a.m. local time

In what is becoming an annual event for me, this morning I got up at 4 a.m. to check out what I could of the Perseid Meteor Shower.  Though the sky was mostly clear lest a few stray clouds, the waning Moon’s brightness was the only unfortunate circumstance compared to last year’s.  Within about an hour I saw two meteors, a long one to the West and a short one close to the Perseid radiant point, very roughly between the constellations Cassiopeia and Perseus.

And speaking of constellations, I did set up my digital camera and took a bunch of long exposures in hopes of capturing a meteor digitally.  Unfortunately this did not pan out, but I did get some interesting and surprising wide-field views of an August early morning sky.

The above image is not stacked, just a 30-second exposure at ISO 3200 pointed at the Perseid Meteor Shower’s radiant point.  I can clearly see Cassiopeia and Perseus, as expected, but then I was surprised at all the other goodies in the photo.

The Pleiades was the first unexpected capture.  I thought my favorite little star cluster was too far East to be in-range of my picture, but there it is, sitting in the very corner.

(Yes, the Pleiades are not a constellation.  They are actually part of Taurus.)

Next I saw the bright stars of Auriga.  At first, I thought one of these was Venus, but upon consulting my sky map app, Venus was much closer to the horizon at this time, hence below my picture.

The extremely faint constellation Camelopardalis is also here.  Since this one isn’t exactly the hot topic of dinner conversations and cocktail parties, I drew it out for you and your friends’ reference, so you can indeed have something to gossip about at that next party.

Part of Cepheus is also visible.

The very last noteworthy object I discovered is Polaris.  So counting Ursa Minor, that’s seven constellations in one picture!  Below is the same picture with all these interesting sky objects called out.  I recommend clicking the image to enlarge it.

Click to enlarge.