Vernal Equinox Moon, Spring 2021, via iPhone

Click for full-sized image.

March 20th, 2021, 08:57 p.m. local time

Happy belated Vernal Equinox for all of you in the Northern Hemisphere.  The start of Spring means that I am done with excuses for not getting my telescopes outside again.  I contemplated taking the Dobsonian into the yard over the past few weeks, but the still very bitter evening chill was always enough for me to shrink back into my warm hole in the ground.

Looking at my records, I can’t believe the last time I took the big scope out was five months ago, on October 13th for the Mars opposition.  But in my defense, it was a particularly brutal late Fall and all of Winter in a variety of ways, from personal to meteorological.  Now I hope to spend at least time on the weekends with my scopes, camera equipment, or both.

My primary target for the evening was the Moon, still in Crescent Phase.  Partially notable were two visible stars visible through the 2″ eyepiece, both extremely close to the Moon’s shadow side.  I captured them in this raw stock iPhone image:

Stellarium confirmed their existence and position at the time observed:

Click for full-sized image (screenshot from Stellarium).

As listed in Stellarium, the bright, closer star is known as 121 Tau / HIP 26248 with magnitude 5.35.  The second dimmer star, in the top right of each image, is HIP 26201, magnitude 6.80.  “Tau” is of course for Taurus.  They reside between the bull’s horn tips, stars named Tianguan and Elnath.

With warmer weather approaching, I should have more opportunities to observe and capture the Spring sky.

Summary of my equipment, settings, and software used:

  • Telescope: Dobsonian reflector 254mm / 10″ (homemade)
  • Camera: iPhone XS
  • Smartphone camera mount for telescope eyepieces
  • Barlow: None
  • Filter: None
  • Eyepeice: Q70 32mm, 2″
  • Software for post-processing:
    • PaintShop Pro for minor touch-ups, cropping

New Spring Moon

Click for full-sized image.

April 7th, 2019, 08:10 p.m. local time

Good evening!  It’s been a while.  Yes, I blame the weather.  But that excuse washed into the recovering ground during today’s first Spring rain.

Since my last post on January’s eclipse, I have observed the night sky when opportunity presented itself.  Looked at Orion when it was high, wishing the winds and cold were not so severe that I could have gotten a telescope outside, or a camera.  It’s always a little depressing this time of year when, just as the weather turns favorably in North America, Taurus and the Pleiades and Orion start nipping at the setting Western Sun.  They prepare for their long seasonal rest.

But there’s always something to look forward to in the sky.  Leo and Regulus are returning.  Scorpius and Antares are just behind.  And the faint teapot of Sagittarius returns as well, along with my hopes of resuming my neglected ongoing search for Pluto.

The early morning sky is the current treat.  Venus and Saturn and Jupiter are all out before dawn.  There are months of planetary viewing ahead.  It will end when Orion begins its return, later this year.

For now though, tonight offered a nice look at the New Crescent Moon within the hour after Sunset.  The clouds and post-rain haze framed our moon alone in the West, with emerging Orion trailing not too far away.

Constellations X: Spring Triangle Fever

Click to see the full image.

May 4th, 2018, 09:50 p.m. local time

For the record, I have had amazingly clear skies ever since late last week.  Each night I have tried to take advantage of these viewing opportunities, especially since the aging Moon has been rising well past midnight.  On Friday night, the first adventure I undertook was the photographing of the Spring Triangle – Arcturus, Regulus, and Spica.

I was not sure if I could capture this asterism in one picture.  The Spring Triangle is much larger than the Summer Triangle.  But I was successful.  It is worth noting that normally, I crop my raw images to focus on whatever the subject of the picture is.  For the Spring Triangle, you are seeing the complete and full dimensions of the source image.  This required the widest setting of my widest lens.  It is a very large patch of sky.

This is not a stacked image.  I went with only 25-second images and different ISOs.  The picture above was at ISO 200.  It was post-processed to remove light pollution and accentuate stars.

So aside from the technical details, what exactly are you looking at?  You can see all of Leo to the right.  Find Regulus and you should be able to trace Leo.  With Arcturus and Spica you can see parts of the constellations Bootes and Virgo, respectively.  In the top middle you see the packed stars of Coma Berenices.

This photography session increased my constellation total to 32.  Bootes, at least partially, is seen.  Also, correcting my previous records, I should have acknowledged earlier that Coma Berenices is a recognized modern constellation.  It was an ancient asterism, originally considered to be part Leo, being the lion’s great and magnificent tail.

  • Ursa Minor
  • Draco
  • Leo the Lion
  • Aquila
  • Sagitta
  • Delphinus
  • Velpecula
  • Lyra
  • Cygnus
  • Taurus
  • Perseus
  • Camelopardalis
  • Auriga
  • Cassiopeia
  • Cepheus
  • Scorpius
  • Ophiuchus
  • Virgo
  • Cancer
  • Leo Minor
  • Lynx
  • Ursa Major
  • Pegasus
  • Andromeda
  • Orion
  • Canis Minor
  • Lepus
  • Monoceros
  • Eridanus
  • Gemini
  • Bootes
  • Coma Berenices

References: